Andreas Vetr

QUALITIES: Support with passion and taste.

QUALITIES: Support with passion and taste.

The best word to describe a pioneering leader is probably the word passion. The enthusiasm for a cause or higher leadership is in the person who inspires others and helps them. These people with passion feel enthusiasm arise within them as soon as they think about the matter or the manager and their plans. The cause and leadership to which they are committed allows them to take clear and purposeful paths. This is how they become courageous and free from fear or worry and let everyone know that.

Leaders who pave the way need this passion to achieve the vision, mission and goals. Every pioneer needs passion. Pioneers cannot be satisfied with maintaining the status quo because there is nothing to maintain yet. You create something out of nothing.

Ordinary people often see these people as eccentric, but their passion and enthusiasm is so intoxicating and attracts other pioneers. What gives passionate people their enthusiasm:

  • You spend time alone. Even before they begin their task, they spend time alone. They spend time in silence and can hardly stay calm. They connect with their creation and become the creator from the inspiration of loneliness without feeling that way.
  • You feel fulfilled by the mission. You feel a certain urgency to prepare the way and know that everything will start soon.
  • You have a magical temperament. They are often good speakers and show ways and admonish.
  • You have a strong sense of justice. When people ask what they should do, they urge them to do what is right. They are driven by the hunger for justice. They would never sit still until they get results.
  • They often see things in black or white. While this sounds narrow-minded to most business people, it is often an essential part of the passion of some great leaders.
  • You feel unsatisfied with everything that was not implemented or resulted in an action. They are doers. They don’t just want to talk about everything, they also challenge everyone to produce results in their actions.

Passion breeds effectiveness. So how can you maintain passion and improve it:

  • Take your temperature. Get honest feedback from those around you. Are you passionate about what you do? You can’t start a fire in your organization if you’re not passionate about the cause yourself.
  • Go back to your first love. Many leaders allow life to derail them. Think back to when you started your career. What motivated you? What excited you?
  • Associate and surround yourself with people who have passion and enthusiasm. Coals stay hot when left in the fire together. Find passionate people and let them get close to you, let’s rub against each other.

ENGLISH:

QUALITIES: Supporting with Passion and Gusto.

The best word to describe a pioneering leader is probably passion. The enthusiasm for a cause or higher leadership is within the person who inspires and helps others. These passionate individuals feel a surge of enthusiasm when they think about the cause or the leadership and their endeavors. The cause and the leadership they have committed themselves to guide them along clear and purposeful paths. They become brave and free from fear or worry, and they let everyone know it.

Leaders who pave the way need this passion to achieve the vision, mission, and goals. Every pioneer needs passion. Pioneers cannot be satisfied with maintaining the status quo because there is nothing to maintain. They create something out of nothing.

Normal people often see these individuals as eccentric, but their passion and enthusiasm are so infectious that they attract other pioneers. What gives passionate people their enthusiasm:

  • They spend time alone. Even before starting their task, they spend time alone. They spend time in silence and can hardly stay still. They connect with their creation and become creators from the inspiration of solitude without feeling lonely.
  • They feel fulfilled by the mission. They feel a certain urgency to prepare the way and know that everything will soon start.
  • They possess a magical temperament. They are often good speakers, showing the way and admonishing.
  • They have a strong sense of justice. When people ask what they should do, they urge them to do what is right. They are driven by a hunger for justice. They would never sit still until they have achieved results.
  • They often see things in black and white. While this may sound narrow-minded to most business people, it is often an essential part that characterizes the passion of some great leaders.
  • They feel unsatisfied with anything that has not been implemented or resulted in action. They are doers. They don’t just talk about everything but challenge everyone to produce results from their actions.

Passion generates effectiveness. So, how can you maintain and enhance passion:

  1. Measure your temperature. Seek honest feedback from others. Are you passionate about what you do? You can’t start a fire in your organization if you don’t burn for the cause yourself.
  2. Go back to your first love. Many leaders allow life to throw them off track. Think back to when you started your career. What drove you? What inspired you?
  3. Associate and surround yourself with people who have passion and enthusiasm. Coals stay hot when they remain together in the fire. Find passionate people and let them come close to you. Let us rub against each other.

TURKISH

QUALITÄTEN: Being encouraged by Passion and Enthusiasm.

First of all, the best word to describe the leadership trait may be passion. Enthusiasm for a topic or high leadership lies within the person who influences and helps other people. Passionate individuals feel their excitement increase when they think about this topic or leadership. Their dedication and leadership enable them to follow clear and purpose-oriented paths. They are brave and free of fear or anxiety and they show it to everyone.

Leaders who pave the way need this passion to achieve the vision, mission and goals. Every pioneer needs passion. Pioneers cannot be content to maintain the status quo because there is nothing to maintain. They create something from nothing.

Normal people often see these individuals as eccentric, but their passion and enthusiasm are very impressive and attract the attention of other pioneers. Things that excite passionate people:

  • They spend time alone. They spend time alone before starting their missions. They spend time in silence and can hardly stand still. They connect with their creations and become creative out of the inspiration of loneliness, but they do not feel lonely.
  • They are satisfied by the mission. They feel a pressure to prepare the way and know that things will start soon.
  • They have a magical character. They are often good speakers, offering guidance and warning.
  • They have a strong sense of justice. When people ask what they should do, they advise them to do the right thing. They act out of desire for justice. They never stop until they get results.
  • They often see things in black or white. While this may seem shortsighted to most business people, it can be an important part of the ambition of some great leaders.
  • They feel dissatisfied with everything that has not been accomplished or translated into action. They are the people who do it. They are not content to just talk about everything, they encourage everyone to reveal the consequences of their actions.

Passion increases effectiveness. So, how can you sustain and develop passion:

  1. Measure your temperature. Get honest feedback from people. Are you passionate about what you do? If you don’t burn with passion for yourself, you can’t start a fire in your organization.
  2. Go back to your first love. Many leaders let life lead them astray. Think back to when you started your career. What motivated you? What excited you?
  3. Associate with and surround yourself with passionate and exciting people. When the coals are together, they stay hot in the fire. Find passionate people and let them be close to you. Let’s reflect on each other by rubbing against each other.