Andreas Vetr

COMMITMENT: “Solve our problems but protect our interests.”

You may be familiar with the situation in which a manager encounters a completely uncontrolled and choleric person or employee who causes unrest. The affected person has often lost control due to excessive demands or other reasons and reacts verbally and below the belt.

When the manager encounters such a person in the team, he will try to free the person from his suffering by investigating the cause and assigning the task to someone else in the team who is overwhelmed and responsible for the emotional outbursts or attacks. The matter is usually resolved and over immediately, the person calms down and can work productively again.

Ironically, the other employees then usually ask the manager not to do this. They are undoubtedly pleased to see the person concerned calm and collected, but are concerned about their own responsibilities and interests. They feared the person who lashed out, but even more they feared the leader who took complete control of the situation. It is important to remember in any conflict: “Leaders don’t want to take sides; They want to take control!”

Often we are like the employees of the department who want the manager to solve their problems, but do not change the department and still save it. “We don’t want to cause unrest or become radical,” we say. “We want change… as long as it doesn’t change us.” But that is not the way for managers.

What do we learn about leadership in this section:

  1. Leadership means discomfort. If you want to be an effective leader, you have to live outside your comfort zone.
  2. Leadership means dissatisfaction. Leaders use dissatisfaction as a tool to move us to bigger things and higher levels.
  3. Leadership means disruption. The status quo is never a leader’s goal. Interruption is our constant companion.

How are you doing in these three areas?

English:

COMMITMENT: “Solve our problems but safeguard our interests.”

You may be familiar with the situation in which a leader encounters a completely uncontrolled and choleric individual or employee who causes unrest. The affected person often loses control due to being overwhelmed or for other reasons and reacts verbally aggressive and unreasonable. When the leader encounters such a person in the team, they will try to free the person from their suffering by exploring the root cause and transferring the task that is overwhelming and responsible for the emotional outbursts or attacks to someone else in the team. The matter is usually resolved and over, the person calms down and can work productively again.

Ironically, the other employees usually ask the leader not to do this. They undoubtedly are pleased to see the affected person calm and composed, but they are worried about their own areas of responsibility and interests. They feared the person who lashed out, but they fear the leader who takes complete control of the situation even more. It is important to remember in every conflict: “Leaders do not want to take sides; they want to take control!”

We often resemble the employees in the department who want the leader to solve their problems, but do not change the department and yet still save it. “We don’t want to cause unrest or be radical,” we say. “We want change… as long as it doesn’t change us.” But that is not the way of leaders.

What do we learn about leadership in this section:

  1. Leadership means discomfort. If you want to be an effective leader, you must live outside the comfort zone.
  2. Leadership means dissatisfaction. Leaders use dissatisfaction as a tool to move us to greater things and higher levels.
  3. Leadership means disruption. The status quo is never the goal of a leader. Disruption is our constant companion.

How are you in these three areas?